Workout of the Day

Reps

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Let’s say you’re set on improving your basketball shooting in preparation for a big game. To do so, you give yourself plenty of time on the court throwing hundreds of balls: layups, in the key, three-pointers, free-throws, etc. And, for the sake of argument, let’s say you walk off the court a few hundred balls later with a pretty impressive shooting average. You’ll probably feel pretty good about yourself, your skill development, and your chances in the game.

But come gametime, you flop. Your shooting average isn’t even half of what it was in practice. You can’t even get off the three-pointers you sunk before, your layups are blocked, you miss some shots even right next to the hoop. And now your confidence has tanked and you don’t feel quite as good as when you walked off the practice court.

Unsurprisingly, practicing basketball in the setting of an empty court where all external variables (opponents, crowds, timing, energy, emotions, etc.) are controlled for doesn’t carry over quite so well into the dynamics of the real game. When I hear people excusing themselves from the practice of lifting heavy weights because they feel the need to “go light to work on form,” I am can’t help but think of the ineffective basketball practice that doesn’t carry over to game time.

Here’s the thing: there is absolutely a time and place for lighter weights that allow you to focus on form by removing the added stress of a challenging load. A beginner, for example, will need to spend some time with lighter weights to gain familiarity with a movement itself, outside of the context of intensity; the same for someone fresh off of an injury, or an athlete relearning a movement to get rid of poor patterning. But to rest on “form” as a justification for not touching heavy weights -- that’s just lazy practice.

In order to play the game, you have to practice the game, not just take easy three-pointers in an empty court.

- PS


4/19/18

  • Handstand skill work

  • Establish max unbroken HSPU

Then...

  • 10 min AMRAP

    • 20 cal row

    • 10 HSPU