Workout of the Day

GPP Skill Highlight: Accuracy

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Accuracy, one of the ten generally recognized physical skills, happens to be among the least appreciated and most-often ignored. Unfortunately, neglecting accuracy is leaving progress on the table for countless athletes. Let’s break it down:

What it is:
> the ability to move something, internal or external, where you want it to go

Where we see it:
> any type of throwing - sport-specific or not, throwing a discus, a ball, a piece of lumber, your child up in the air, or dirty socks into the laundry
> any ball-sport - basketball, golf, soccer, ping-pong, you name it
> everyday life - reaching for something, placing an object on a surface, stepping into or out of a space, navigating uneven terrain, tossing a crumpled paper into the garbage
> marksmanship - while modern life doesn’t require us to hunt our own food, the importance of accuracy in any marksman situation, be it with bow and arrow, firearm, or any other projectile, is undeniable
> weightlifting - accuracy is required in moving both the bar and your body to the proper place every time -- accuracy errors, particularly at heavier loads, guarantee a missed lift
> moving your own body or any other object through space - taking a step, hitting depth every rep on a squat, completing the transition of a muscle-up, pressing an object overhead, completing a flip or roll -- if you move, it involves accuracy

Why you need it:
> safety - a body moved without accuracy is a body that’s dangerous to itself and others
> efficiency - inaccurate movement is inefficient movement, as the body has to commit extra energy to correcting deviations from the path of greatest efficiency and least resistance
> performance - high-skill and high-threshold movements all require accuracy to varying degrees -- undeveloped accuracy is a guaranteed decrement to performance
> impress your friends - who wants to be the guy/gal who misses the trash can every time you make a shot?

How to train it:
> repeated practice at very low loads - accuracy is a neurological adaptation, and therefore requires practice; remove the high demands on strength/power/speed, and drill accuracy -- the more reps the better -- as it develops, gradually add load and speed
> dynamic movements - start slow, then add speed -- accuracy that can only be demonstrated in very specific and controlled conditions and without any speed is mostly useless
> explore accuracy in all of your movement - the next time you’re moving, whether it be walking, playing drums, completing air squats, or performing a clean & jerk, ask: Am I being accurate? Am I even aware of what accuracy feels like? Can I focus on and improve my accuracy?

Don't leave holes in your game!

- PS


5/17/17

  • Chin-over-bar hold - 4x max time

  • “Helen”

  • 3 rounds, for time:

    • 400m run

    • 21 KB swings (53/35)

    • 12 pull-ups