Workout of the Day

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The stereotype of the dumb jock is a curious one. On the one hand, you can visit any globo gym during peak hours and probably find a pretty good case study on what it means to fit the stereotype. But let’s not let the exception be the rule. Evidence shows us that regular exercise actually increases your cognitive capacities. Take, for example, a study done at the University of British Columbia in which they found that regular aerobic conditioning increased the size of the hippocampus, the part of the brain involved in verbal learning and memory. Additional research has found that individuals who exercise regularly have larger prefrontal and medial temporal cortices, areas of the brain involved in thinking skills and memory. Even better news: 6-12 months of regular exercise for previously sedentary individuals has been demonstrated to cause significant positive change in these structures. Other benefits such as diminished cognitive impairment in later life, improved focus, and increased performance on IQ tests have been demonstrated, too. And this doesn’t even touch on the emotional benefits of exercise and their effects on cognitive performance and well-being.

Our case file for “reasons to move” is bursting at the seams. While you could make the case that you don’t “need” to exercise in order to live (there are plenty of old, sedentary people out there), we would insist that strength and conditioning is vital to leading a full and fruitful life.

Already incorporating regular strength and conditioning into your life?

Great. Keep on it.

Looking to make a change and incorporate training into your life?

Give us a call: (949) 229-8049

Lift strong and prosper!

- PS


2/22/19

  • 6 mins to establish max unbroken DUs

Then...

  • For time:

    • 100 DUs

    • 60 cal row

    • 800m run

    • 100 DUs


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In case you’ve been hiding out under a rock recently, let me be the first to tell you: the CrossFit Open starts this week. And that means that Friday Night Lights is back for the next 5 weeks. You can expect fitness, camaraderie, tacos, and whatever fun you want to bring to the party.

Here’s how it will go down.

Starting this Friday, February 22nd and continuing every Friday for the next 5 weeks, we will gather at 5:00pm sharp to complete the CrossFit Open workout of the week together. We will provide tacos (we supply the meats and tortillas, you bring the rest) to fuel your efforts, and welcome all who care to partake to enjoy some hard earned beverages. Bring a side or taco accessory (chips, salsa, guac, etc.), and bring whatever you want to drink, plus a little extra for a friend.

This event if free to current students, and $25 for friends of the gym, drop-ins, or out-of-towners. All are welcome! Please email info@noboundariesathletics.net if you’d like to drop in or if you have any questions.

Please arrive early to get yourself warmed up and ready to go. Friends and family are welcome to join (you don’t even have to work out!). See you Friday!
P.S. We need a few extra judges to make things go smoothly -- you can take the CrossFit Judges Course HERE, and learn a thing or two about movement standards and help your community out.

- PS


2/21/18

  • Sandbag over shoulder - 3,3,3,3

Then...

  • 4 rounds for reps:

    • 30s max SB over shoulder (AHAP)

    • 60s rest

    • 30s max burpees

    • 60s rest


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It turns out that your most easily defensible position could also be the very thing holding you back.

Imagine you are speaking to a double amputee who tells you that he doesn’t really exercise any more because of the limitations that come from being a double amputee. On the one hand, I would struggle to openly challenge his position. Being a double amputee feels like a pretty strongly defensible reason not exercise if there ever was one, and I can’t even begin to imagine the challenges it would bring into daily life, much less navigating something like exercise. On the other hand, you and I both know that exercise could be one of the best things a double amputee could dedicate their energy to in order to gain independence, promote healing, and continue to grow in new ways.

We all have our defenses, many of them true. Stories, positions, conditions, etc. that account for why we should not or cannot do X, Y, or Z. The challenge is, these defenses are good enough that the only person who can take them down is you. You are busy, or injury-prone, or introverted, or lack confidence, and all of that is and will be as true as you allow it to be. But the moment you reject that premise and understand that it’s truth is rooted in your belief in it, is the moment you can move beyond it.

Check your strongest defenses. They may be your biggest limiter.

- PS


2/20/19

  • With a partner, 20min AMRAP:

    • Partner 1) 250m row

    • Partner 2) 25 KBS (53/35)

    • -switch-

    • Partner 1) 250m row

    • Partner 2) 25 push-ups

    • -switch-

    • Partner 1) 250m row

    • Partner 2) 25 bent over DB row (40/25)

    • -switch-

    • Partner 1) 250m row

    • Partner 2) 25 DB front squat (40/25)

    • -switch-


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As a kid, I remember being told that breakfast was the most important meal of the day. Medical professionals, media, family -- they all made sure to emphasize the importance of breakfast, that you should never skip it, how it would kickstart your metabolism for the day (whatever that means), allow your brain to perform at its best, supply you with vital nutrients, keep you from overeating at other meals, help manage body weight, etc. Fast forward a couple decades and now you’re likely to hear something that sounds quite the opposite. Intermittent fasting is a hot topic, limiting your eating window comes highly recommended, and the alleged benefits of fasting in the morning just keep rolling in: it helps you metabolize fats better, you have less brain fog, helps with gut healing, helps manage body weight, prevents overeating, can improve recovery and performance, etc. And so we’re left with a list of basically same alleged benefits derived from two completely opposite actions. We’ve seen the same remarkable 180 degree turnarounds in many health, diet, and fitness claims as well: butter, heavy lifting, coffee consumption -- the list goes on.

So should you eat breakfast? I don’t know. It depends, really. I know that’s not the answer you came here for, but it is the answer. Human health and fitness is nuanced and individualized that we have to face two challenging realities when it comes to these questions: 1) no matter how sure we are, we don’t actually know for sure; and 2) there is no one-size-fits-all answer.

This means you’ll need to test and learn, to some degree, what works for you. This should start with what is well established. If it has worked for tens of millions of people before, there’s a good chance it will work for you. Then it must stand the test of time. Eat breakfast every day for 60 days. Then skip breakfast every day for 60 days. Pay attention. Write things down. What differences did you notice? What benefits and side effects did each bring? Often, the clearest answer will be the one you earn and discover for yourself.

Happy experimenting!

- PS


2/19/19

  • Deadlift - 5,5,5

Then...

  • For time:

    • 20 deadlifts (225/155)

    • 800m run


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Nowhere are we more likely to falter in our habits and choices than in what is considered “normal.” However, what is often considered normal is in fact common, not normal. Being sedentary for 15 hours a day is common, being unable to bend over to tie your shoelaces is common, relying on processed and fast foods as a staple for your and your family’s nutrition is common; but none of these are “normal” by any historical or biological stretch of the imagination.

What is common is easily defensible. “Everyone’s doing it.” We tell kids it’s not a fair excuse for their poor behavior, but that doesn’t keep most folks (young and old) from falling for the same trap.

Here’s the cut and dry: if you want to lead a healthy life, you’re going to be uncommon. You are required to engage in some healthy and productive deviance.

Look around at the lifestyle choices that are made because they are common, and then question them mercilessly. You’re probably better off being uncommon, after all.

- PS


2/18/19

  • 12min AMRAP

    • 12 C2B pull-ups

    • 12 HSPU

    • 12 box jumps (30”/24”)


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Your energy, emotions, and perceptions are among the resources you should hold most dear. They are finite, and they define your behavior and experience. With this, we must answer the question: who (or what) holds the keys to these resources? Do you freely hand out access to the driver who cuts you off, to the barrage of daily distractions, or to the uncontrollable circumstance that arises? It should be no surprise that this is a poor use of your limited resources.

The goal is not to hoard your energy, but to protect these resources, to give them (and consequently, yourself) the opportunity to flourish, and to give them out with intention where you see value. Take this to heart: what you have is something precious. So act like it!

- PS


2/15/19

  • Overhead squat - 5,5,3,3,3,1,1,1,1,1


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I’m always discovering new “accidental” benefits (or as I like to call them, cherries on top) of the regular practice of rigorous physical exercise. One such benefit is hard to point to in a physical sense, perhaps even hard to demonstrate or perform, but valuable all the same: physical confidence.

Let me be clear: I’m not talking about the struttin’ your stuff type of confidence you see on the red carpet of the Grammys, or the bravado you see dramatized on the MTV classic “Jersey Shore.” I’m talking about the kind of confidence that a professional driver has in her vehicle -- she knows exactly how the vehicle works, what it is capable of and incapable of, she knows where can push the limits, where she ought to pull back, where the fringes lie and how to use them. This confidence develops over time, and reflects an exploration of the fringes of your capacities.

What this physical confidence allows is continued growth, and a comfort in the vehicle of your own body. To continue the driving metaphor, being new to physical training can be a lot like someone off the street sitting down in the cockpit of a Formula 1 car and trying to give it a spin on the track. You can barely figure out how to start the darn thing, much less navigate tight turns or understand the acceleration and braking capacities. After putting in the hours testing, pushing, and challenging yourself in training, you become comfortable in your vehicle, able to push it and work with it.

It’s a benefit that you can start earning right away and continue earning over months and years, and everyone, beginner or pro, has the opportunity to progress it.

Let’s just say this: the metaphorical ice cream sundae of rigorous physical training is littered with cherries. Continue to dig in, and you’ll probably find the sweet toppings just keep piling up.

- PS


2/14/19

  • 3 rounds for quality:

    • 10 strict ring dips

    • 10 strict ring rows

Then...

  • In 21 mins:

    • Row for max distance

    • Every 3 mins, complete 20 V-ups


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Did you know that CrossFit No Boundaries was recently honored in the 12th annual “Best of” issue of the Capistrano Dispatch? We are pleased to have taken gold in the category of “Best Group Workout” and silver in the category of “Best Gym” (check it out HERE), and we are grateful most of all to our community that has contributed to this and all other honors received.

Of course it feels good to be recognized publicly, but ultimately our value lies in the changes we’ve helped past and current students make in their lives. It’s perhaps a bit hard to quantify, but it’s the fuel that stokes our fire far more than any magazine award.

Thank you!

(P.S. Know someone who could use some “Best of” quality coaching and fitness in their life? Share the good word, we’d love to help them out!)

- PS


2/13/19

  • 20min EMOM

    • Min 1: Max cal bike

    • Min 2: Max K2E

    • Min 3: Max keg C&P (AHAP)

    • Min 4: Rest


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The CrossFit Open is an annual, worldwide competition geared towards CrossFit athletes of all skills and experience levels. For five weeks, individuals and gyms across the world participate in The Open -- a series of five events spread over five weeks, all performed in the comfort of your own local CrossFit gym. Both scaled and “RX” versions of each event are released, so don’t worry if you haven’t mastered the elusive muscle-up or can’t deadlift double your bodyweight yet. Participants can expect challenges, exciting opportunities to put your training to the test, and of course camaraderie and cheer. You might surprise yourself with a PR or two, also.

Whether you consider yourself a competitor or not, this is an incredible opportunity to engage in some vulnerability and test your physical and mental development. It’s been known to lead to have a good time, too.

All you need to do to participate is sign up through the CrossFit Open website HERE and register as a member of our affiliate. The first event is announced on February 21st, so don’t wait to sign up.

Not sure if it’s for you? See more details about The Open HERE, and talk to your coach to get a good idea of what you can expect from The Open.
- PS


2/12/19

  • Front squat - 5,5,5

Then...

  • For time:

    • 100 strict push-ups

    • *every time you stop, complete 5 front squats (155/105)


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When I taught middle school writing, one of my favorite exercises to give my students was to write a response to a prompt while following a handful of constraints on their writing. For example, I would ask them to write a description of the most beautiful sunset they had ever seen without naming any colors, or to tell a story of a time they were scared without the use of the word “scared” or any of its many synonyms. These assignments usually started with students’ mild dismay and lots of “how on earth am I going to do that?” and ended with no small degree of excitement, pride, and clever problem solving. You can describe what a metaphor is until you’re blue in the face and the average middle school student won’t take much from the lesson, or you can apply some constraints (describe a sunset without naming any colors, for example) and the concept of metaphor comes to life.

While this is one small example, I think it’s a rather universal truth that we tend to perform at our best when constraints are applied. Constraints create our ideal space for problem solving and creativity, they cut out the noise, and they focus and direct our attention. There’s a reason that so many television shows -- cooking, home design, etc. -- rest on this premise of constraints. We are drawn to it and do well with it.

While you may not be interested in practicing your application of metaphors by describing a sunset without naming colors, I ask you: what problems could you solve or new perspectives could you uncover by applying your own constraints?

- PS


2/11/19

  • 5 attempts:

    • 5-10-20 shuttle run

    • *record fastest

Then...

  • Every 2 mins for 16 mins:

    • 100m sprint

    • *record fastest